Episode 076: UFRaw revisited

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Download the companion file! (…if there is one…. πŸ˜‰ )

I got a mail from Pascal de Bruijn, the man behind the p-code blog. He knows a lot about colour management, RAW processing and so on. He had seen episode 11 and pointed me to some errors and stuff that is new in UFRaw. So I read his mail and had a look.

This is really a fast forward through the program, nothing really in depth. It can be a guide for experimenting. If you know not much about RAW processing, have a look at episode 11. It covers some basics about the technology behind it.

I used the UFRaw version compiled by Pascal. You can find it for Ubuntu on his site – other OS have to look around. Start with the UFRaw home page.

I’ll have an eye surgery tomorrow (lens replacement) and had not much time to prepare this episode. TOC and more will follow. And I’ll be off screen for some days until I am allowed to read again.

The TOC

0:00 Intro
0:26 Statistics
1:50 Pascal’s e-mail blog.pcode.nl
4:16 – Fire up UFRaw!
4:30 – Color matrix vs. Color profile
5:57 β€” Working Color Space Profile
6:33 β€” Rendering Intent Option
8:50 – Details Restauration & Highlight Clippings
10:13 – Import base curves from .NCV
10:26 – Auto black point correction works perfectly!
11:13 – New features in new version of UFRaw
11:36 – LensFun
14:00 – Fix cromatic aberration
15:57 – Optical Vignetting
16:23 – Lens distortion – Panotools
17:16 – Lens geometry
19:18 Outro

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31 thoughts on “Episode 076: UFRaw revisited

  1. Hi Rolf,

    there is nothing much to add to the get-well-wishes. So I thought instead of bringing flowers or cookies, I give you this home-made table of contents:

    0:00 Intro
    0:26 Statistics
    1:50 Pascal’s e-mail blog.pcode.nl
    4:16 – Fire up UFRaw!
    4:30 – Color matrix vs. Color profile
    5:57 — Working Color Space Profile
    6:33 — Rendering Intent Option
    8:50 – Details Restauration & Highlight Clippings
    10:13 – Import base curves from .NCV
    10:26 – Auto black point correction works perfectly!
    11:13 – New features in new version of UFRaw
    11:36 – LensFun
    14:00 – Fix cromatic aberration
    15:57 – Optical Vignetting
    16:23 – Lens distortion – Panotools
    17:16 – Lens geometry
    19:18 Outro

    It’s yours, do whatever you want to do with it πŸ™‚

    Stefan

  2. The “blubb” is the best part here πŸ˜€ Sounds so funny…

    One thought about the film button: As I experienced this button simulates the contrast of analogue films, which is basically a reduction of contrast in the highlights*. This helps a lot with over-exposed images (or parts of them) that still have deep shadows. On correct exposed images the digital setting should be chosen – otherwise the picture will look low in contrast and grey.

    * Actually, I read a book from 1960. I was told that one should overexpose a little bit at critical images. In books about digital photography it is written that one should underexpose. Therefore, I would say, that analogue films can handle overexposed parts better, digital sensors handle underexposed parts better.

  3. @Mathias…

    It really depends on what you call underexpose. It’s right you shouldn’t overexpose (blow out whites) on a digital sensor. However there is a technique called “Expose to the Right”, which basically means with a digital sensor you should expose as much as possible (without over exposing). Meaning no pixel should have 255 as value. Your camera’s overexposure indicator should blink. And your histogram would probably lean to the right (this is what the technique gets it’s name from).

    This may very well mean the image may seem overexposed to the human eye, but a digital sensor is linear, it just means you’re optimally using the sensors dynamic range.

  4. Just sneaking in a bit – I a m not allowed to read until Sunday. But 3 minutes… πŸ˜‰

    All went well, thanks for the good wishes!

    And off screen again.

  5. I have a problem with UFRaw which I cannot solve. I drag an image into Gimp and UFRaw appears with the image as expected. When I press OK the image moves into Gimp, as expected but the image is only a thumbnail. I have tried various combinations of gimp-ufraw, Gimp and Ubuntu but the result is the same, Gimp 2.6.?, Ubuntu 8.04 and 8.10 on my old desktop. On another a laptop I have, the UFRaw – Gimp relationship works perfectly. This question has been asked in lots of places and useful answers have been niil.

  6. Norman, I have no idea how to tackle this. πŸ™ Except deleting /renaming the config file of UFRaw for a test. Perhaps there is something funny in it.

  7. Does anyone know how to turn lensfun on in UFRaw? I have no problem with anything else, but I really do want the lens correction from lensfun. I’m using Windows XP if that makes a difference. Thanks for any help.

  8. To complete the story I removed every file and folder I could find involving ufraw, re-installed ufraw 0.14.1 and the problem had gone.

  9. Pingback: The p-Code Machine » Meet The GIMP

  10. Pingback: The p-Code Machine » UFRaw FAQ

  11. Thank you! I was completely in the dark so far, and goodness knows how many of my own photos I have spoiled by not being careful about raw conversion. GIMP automatically firing up UFRaw wasnt helpful enough for me to figure out I needed to be careful, but no excuses for my ignorance.

    Thanks Rolf, again.

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